Racism

Resisting Prison Labor

by Matt

Black Agenda Report: “Prisoner rights advocates will converge for what aims to be the largest abolitionist demonstration in U.S. history, [Saturday, August 19], in Washington D.C. The Millions for Prisoners’ Human Rights March is centered around the demand that the exceptions clause, which allows for slavery to continue in United States prisons, be removed from the Constitution’s 13th Amendment.”

Since we’re in a period of heightened consciousness about slavery and its legacies, this is an especially important time to talk about compulsory prison labor, or, more bluntly, prison slavery; enslavement of incarcerated people.

I have no desire to break down the components of the moral case against slavery, but must at least partially do so to point out how enslavement of the incarcerated is an especially nefarious kind of human exploitation.

Labor produces value. Prisoners’ compulsory–or even very-low-paid–labor facilitates the production of value for privileged entities (the state, private corporations who get in on the action) and extracts that value, working the body and mind of people at their most vulnerable. Not even the weak justification for the wage system (people are free to walk away and find other work, live in other labor communities) is present in the context of incarceration. I believe this all amounts to something foundationally evil and unjust, which bypasses whatever moral judgment may fall on the prisoner. I’m betting most people reading this believe the same.

Nazism, the Confederacy, China’s authoritarian capitalism, all have slave labor as their material foundations (so does Classical Greece, but that’s another post). That’s the backdrop of Nazis in Charlottesville, and prison labor is another head of the Hydra.

The Black Agenda Report piece by Kyle Fraser summarizes the corporate and governmental profiteering that steers the prison labor ship, and is a good starting read. Last year’s Think Progress piece by Carimah Townes is a longer and more detailed read, definitely worth the time.

Confederate statues should be removed because they are non-living remnants of slavery. Prison labor, on the other hand, should be abolished because it’s a *living* remnant of slavery.

Photo By Royalbroil – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, at Wikimedia Commons
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How Racism and Capitalism Work Together in Policing

by Matt Stannard

Municipal and state police forces’ use of intimidating and lethal superweapons is a result of the private, for-profit production of such weapons and accompanying lobbying to create policing policies that favor those weapons. But that production and distribution couldn’t work except over a backdrop of anti-Blackness, and the ability of police ideologists to interpret disadvantaged neighborhoods and the trauma of historical oppression as Black criminality.

Racism and capitalism work together in tandem again in the training of police officers by private training firms with the same material interests as the weapons makers. The fastest way to turn police forces into consumers of those weapons is to teach cops that they need to be very, very afraid of people of color. The obvious solutions are to take control of the situation and eliminate any threat to the safety of the officer as quickly as possible. This imperative, propped up in the consciousness of police officers even if they aren’t overtly racist, must be constantly replenished.

Matt Stannard is policy director for Commonomics USA. 

Photo: By Daviskorn at English Wikipedia – Fed Up Queers, Public Domain